Teaching

Hannah teachingHannah takes Psychology of Environmental Sustainability outside for class discussion.

Human Memory (PSYC 460)
  • Instructor - Brian Bornstein
  • Brief DescriptionThis course will provide a detailed overview of current research issues and theory in human memory and the methods by which human memory is explored in contemporary experimental psychology.  Prior completion of 12 hours of psychology, including Psychology 350 (or an equivalent course in research methodology) and Cognitive Psychology (PSYC 263), are prerequisites for this course.
  • Syllabus

Psychology of Environmental Sustainability (PSYC 498)
  • Instructor - Hannah Dietrich and Joe Hamm
  • Brief Description - The primary cause of environmental problems is human behavior.  Sustainability, therefore, can be achieved through changes in how people interact with and toward the environment. This course will use psychological theory and research to understand the role of human behavior in sustainability efforts, but will also include an interdisciplinary approach in which we evaluate the role of the law, natural resource management, ethics, and policy-making as they relate to environmental problems. Students in this course will learn not only to apply psychology’s major theoretical perspectives to an interdisciplinary understanding of environmentally-linked behavior, but also to evaluate and suggest changes we can make as individuals (and as a society) to help protect our environment.
  • Syllabus

Eyewitness Memory (Topics in Law/Psychology, PSYC 989/LAW 764/764G)
  • Instructor - Brian Bornstein
  • Brief Description - This course is intended as an introduction to empirical research and caselaw on eyewitness memory.  Although the topic overlaps considerably with areas of basic memory research--e.g., face recognition, episodic memory, source monitoring--the focus will be mostly on applied research looking at the memory performance of real (or simulated) witnesses to a crime.
  • Syllabus

History and Systems of Psychology (PSYC 910)
  • Instructor - Brian Bornstein
  • Brief Description - This course is intended as an overview of the history of psychology: its origins, important figures, themes and controversies.  We will cover a great deal of territory, in the senses of geography, chronology, and academic discipline. From a geographical perspective, many countries have made important contributions to the study of psychology and its development as a science, including ancient Greece and Rome, France, Great Britain, Germany, Austria, Russia, and the United States, to mention just a few. Fortunately for our purposes, most of this work has been translated into English. From a chronological perspective, the course covers material from approximately the 7th century B.C.E. to the present.  We will cover as much of this range as possible, with a greater emphasis on some periods than others. Major contributors to psychology have, over the years, come from a variety of backgrounds. Thus, from a disciplinary perspective, we will cover what—at least at the time it was done—was viewed as philosophy, religion, physiology/medicine, or sociology. Only over time did these diverse threads come to be woven together and thought of as psychology. Throughout the course, we will attempt to understand major figures and movements within the context of their particular time and place. The goals of the course are for you to gain an appreciation of how psychology has come to be what it is today, to become familiar with some of the major figures in that development, and to situate your own research interests in a historical context.
  • Syllabus