Academic Papers

TC3
Trans Collaborations Clinical Check-In (TC3): Initial Validation of a Clinical Measure for Transgender and Gender Diverse Adults Receiving Psychological Services, Behavior Therapy

Authors: Natalie Holt, Zach Huit, Grant Shulman, Jane Meza, Jolene Smyth, Nathan Woodruff, Richard Mocarski, Jae Puckett, Debra Hope


Key Points

  • This article presents initial validation of a behavioral health measure, the Trans Collaborations Clinical Check-in (TC3), for use with TGD clients
  • The TC3 was developed with substantial community and stakeholder input
  • Scores on the TC3 relate to important psychological domains including depression, anxiety, and marginalization stress
  • TC 3 is available here and is free for clinical or research purposes, do not modify without permission. Please let us know if you publish any data using the TC3 at transcollaborations@unl.edu.

Holt, N. R., Huit, T. Z., Shulman, G. P., Meza, J. L., Smyth, J. D., Woodruff, N., Mocarski, R., Puckett, J. A., & Hope, D. A. (2019). Trans Collaborations Clinical Check-in (TC 3 ): Initial Validation of a Clinical Measure for Transgender and Gender Diverse Adults Receiving Psychological Services. Behavior Therapy, 50(6), 1136–1149. doi: 10.1016/j.beth.2019.04.001



Review of Current Literature Recommendations for TGD Therapy
A Systematic Review of Recommendations for Behavioral Health Services with Transgender and Gender Diverse Adults: The Three-Legged Stool of Evidence-Based Practice is Unbalanced

Authors: Natalie Holt, Allura Ralston, Debra Hope, Richard Mocarski, & Nathan Woodruff


Key Points

  • Utilizing evidence-based practice in psychology is important to ensure that clients receive behavioral health services that are supported by the best available research evidence but are also tailored to the individual and provided by an experienced clinician.
  • This article reviews recommendations for therapy with transgender and gender diverse adults to identify if the current literature incorporates aspects of research evidence, patient characteristics, clinical judgment, and assessment.
  • This article found that all components of evidence-based practice are not equally represented in therapy recommendations.

Holt, N. R., Ralston, A. L., Hope, D. A., Mocarski, R., & Woodruff, N. (in press). A systematic review of recommendations for behavioral health services with transgender and gender diverse adults: The three-legged stool of evidence-based practice is unbalanced. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice.



Trans Collaborations Advocacy Efforts
Advocacy opportunities from academic-community partnerships: Three examples from Trans Collaborations

Authors: Debra Hope, Nathan Woodruff, & Richard Mocarski


Key Points

  • This article is part of a special section on psychologists’ role in advocacy to support the health of marginalized populations. We have posted a link to the entire issue. Our paper starts on p. 247.
  • Although advocacy is not the primary mission of Trans Collaborations, we have had opportunities to advocate and support TGD communities in important ways, including Camp BOLD, our camp for TGD youth and their families.
  • Community-academic partnerships can have important benefits for the community at large by leveraging the relationships and resources of the partnership.

Hope, D. A., Woodruff, N., Mocarski, R (2020). Advocacy opportunities from academic-community partnerships: Three examples from Trans Collaborations. The Behavior Therapist, 43, 247-249.



Analysis of WPATH Providers Websites
Specialists in name or practice? The inclusion of transgender and gender diverse identities in online materials of gender specialists

Authors: Natalie R. Holt, Robyn E. King, Richard Mocarski, Nathan Woodruff & Debra A. Hope


Key Points

  • Analysis of intake forms and websites of behavioral health and medical providers who are members of the World Professional Association for Transgender Health (WPATH)
  • Most (82.5%) providers stated they have a specialty to work with TGD clients, but only about half used gender-affirming language on their intake forms
  • Even when seeking care from a gender specialist, TGD people may experience stigmatizing materials

Natalie R. Holt, Robyn E. King, Richard Mocarski, Nathan Woodruff & Debra A. Hope (2020) Specialists in name or practice? The inclusion of transgender and gender diverse identities in online materials of gender specialists, Journal of Gay & Lesbian Social Services, DOI: 10.1080/10538720.2020.1763225



Interviews with Mental Health Providers
The Provider Perspective on Behavioral Health Care for Transgender and Gender Non-conforming Individuals in the Central Great Plains: A Qualitative Study of Approaches and Needs

Authors: Natalie Holt, Debra Hope, Richard Mocarski, Heather Meyer, Robyn King, Nathan Woodruff


Key Points

  • Ten interviews with affirming mental health providers in the Central Great Plains
  • Providers emphasized the importance of individualizing care, helping clients navigate stigma, and finding support and resources
  • Providers' approaches to therapy mapped onto cultural competency, but few discussed using an evidence-based model

Holt, N. R., Hope, D. A., Mocarski, R., Meyer, H., King, R., & Woodruff, N. (2020). The Provider Perspective on Behavioral Health Care for Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Individuals in the Central Great Plains: A Qualitative Study of Approaches and Needs. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 90(1), 136–146. https://doi.org/10.1037/ort0000406



Interviews with TGD Folx about Health Care Experiences
Unmet Expectations in Health Care Settings: Experiences of Transgender and Gender Diverse Adults in the Central Great Plains

Authors: Heather Meyers, Richard Mocarski, Natalie Holt, Debra Hope, Robyn King, Nathan Woodruff


Key Points

  • This paper discusses unmet expectations in the TGD patient and health care interactions based on in depth interviews with TGD individuals.
  • Four main themes of unmet expectations were inappropriate probing questions, gatekeeping, stigmatizing stance, and misgender/deadnaming.
  • Recommendations for better experiences with health care providers are discussed.

Meyer, H. M., Morcarski, R., Holt, N. R., Hope, D. A., King, R. E., & Woodruff, N., (2020) Unmet Expectations in Health Care Settings: Experiences of Transgender and Gender Diverse Adults in the Central Great Plains. Qualitative Health Research, 30(3), 409-422. doi.org/10.1177/1049732319860265



Chosen Name
Renaming me: Assessing the influence of gender identity on name selection

Authors: Sharon Obasi, Richard Mocarski, Natalie Holt, Debra Hope, Nathan Woodruff


Key Points

  • Chosen to be the American Name Society's 2019 Best Article of the Year.
  • This paper explores how transgender and gender diverse people choose a name to reflect their gender identity.

Obasi, S. N., Mocarski, R., Holt, N. R., Hope, D. A., & Woodruff, N. (2019 ). Renaming me: Assessing the influence of gender identity on name selection. Names: A Journal of Onomastics, 67(4), 199-211. doi.org/10.1080/00277738.2018.1536188



Analysis of Mental Health Providers Websites
First Impressions Online: The Inclusion of Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Identities and Services in Mental Healthcare Providers' Online Materials in the USA

Authors: Natalie Holt, Debra Hope, Richard Mocarski, Nathan Woodruff


Key Points

  • Only about half of therapists who advertise online as working with TGNC clients use affirming language to ask about gender on their intake forms
  • Therapists in states with few legal protections for TGNC people use stigmatizing language on intake forms more often than therapists in states with legal protections
  • TGNC clients may face stigma in their search for a therapist and before face-to-face interaction with therapists

Holt, N. R., Hope, D. A., Mocarski, R., & Woodruff, N. (2019). First impressions online: The inclusion of transgender and gender nonconforming identities and services in mental healthcare providers' online materials in the USA. International Journal of Transgenderism, 20(1), 49-62, doi.org/10.1080/15532739.2018.1428842



Review of TGD Related Questionnaires
A Review of Contemporary Assessment Tools for Use With Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Adults. Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity

Authors: Grant Shulman, Natalie Holt, Debra Hope, Richard Mocarski, Joshua Eyer, Nathan Woodruff


Key Points

  • Reviews 8 culturally-responsive questionnaires for use with TGNC populations
  • Recent assessment tools focus less on diagnosis of gender-related disorders and instead measure constructs important for quality of life and psychological well-being
  • More research is needed on the validity of these tools

Shulman, G. P., Holt, N. R., Hope, D. A., Mocarski, R., Eyer, J., & Woodruff, N. (2017). A Review of Contemporary Assessment Tools for Use With Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Adults. Psychology Of Sexual Orientation And Gender Diversity, 4(3), 304-313, doi.org/10.1037/sgd0000233



Discussion of TGD Behavioral Service Needs
Culturally Competent Evidence-Based Behavioral Health Services for the Transgender Community: Progress and Challenges

Authors: Debra Hope, Richard Mocarski, Chandra Bautista, Natalie Holt


Key Points

  • The mental health field has contributed to TGNC stigma
  • Mental health care providers need more than good intentions to provide affirmative services to TGNC communities
  • Proposes a research agenda to develop evidence-based behavioral health care for TGNC communities

*Paper was mentioned in the Huffington Post.

Hope, D. A., Mocarski, R., Bautista, C. L., & Holt, N. R. (2016). Culturally competent evidence-based behavioral health services for the transgender community: Progress and challenges. American Journal Of Orthopsychiatry86(4), 361-365. doi.org/10.1037/ort0000197